LIST OF BUILDINGS OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST

Photo:Church of St Michael and All Angels

Church of St Michael and All Angels

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:St Michael and All Angels

St Michael and All Angels

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Thomas Tipper Monument

Thomas Tipper Monument

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Memorial to Captain James Hanson and the crew of HMS Brazen

Memorial to Captain James Hanson and the crew of HMS Brazen

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Wall enclosing the churchyard of the Church of St Michael and All Angels

Wall enclosing the churchyard of the Church of St Michael and All Angels

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:19 High Street

19 High Street

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:National Westminster Bank

National Westminster Bank

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:The Bridge Hotel

The Bridge Hotel

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:5 Chapel Street

5 Chapel Street

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:1-3 Chapel Street, dwellings over shops

1-3 Chapel Street, dwellings over shops

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Marine Workshops

Marine Workshops

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Carpenters Shop / Timber Seasoning Store

Carpenters Shop / Timber Seasoning Store

Photo:The Old Rectory and St Michael's Cottage

The Old Rectory and St Michael's Cottage

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Newhaven Down's Hospital (one-time workhouse)

Newhaven Down's Hospital (one-time workhouse)

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Manor House, Denton

Manor House, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:10 Heighton Road, Denton

10 Heighton Road, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Remains of Priest's House, Denton

Remains of Priest's House, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Remains of Priest's House, Denton

Remains of Priest's House, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Church of St Leonard, Denton

Church of St Leonard, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Photo:Church of St Leonard, Denton

Church of St Leonard, Denton

Sylvia Woolford

Dept of National Heritage (16 February 1993)

Here is a list and photos of the protected buildings in Newhaven:

Grade II* (being particularly important buildings of more then special interest):

Church of St Michael and All Angels, Church Hill.

Church of St Leonard, Heighton Road, Denton.

 

Grade II (being of special interest which warrant every effort being made to preserve them)

The Bridge Hotel, Bridge Street.

1-3 Chapel Street (dwellings over shops).

5 Chapel Street (light industrial building)

Memorial to Captain James Hanson and the crew of HMS Brazen (north-east corner of churchyard, Church Hill.

Thomas Tipper monumnet (20m west of porch- churchyard, Church Hill).

Wall enclosing the churchyard of the Church of St Michael and All Angels, Church Hill.

Newhaven Downs Hospital (one-time workhouse), Church Hill.

The Old Rectory and St Michael's Cottage, Church Hill.

Wall on east side of Church Hill (returning along Meeching Rise).

60-66 Heighton Road (Farmhouse), Denton.

10 Heighton Road, Denton.

Remains of Priest's House (near Church of St Leonard, Heighton Road, Denton).

Walls enclosing the Churchyard, Church of St Leonard, Heighton Road, Denton.

Duccanus Works (adjoining the Manor House, Heighton Road, Denton).

Manor House, Heighton Road, Denton.

National Westminster Bank, 5 High Street.

19 High Street (offices).

The Carpenter's shop and Paint Store and Timber Seasoning Shed, Railway Quay.

The Marine Workshops, Railway Quay.

 

 

This page was added by Sylvia Woolford on 07/05/2010.
Comments about this page

As nice as they are, what is so significant about the buildings listed in Chapel Street? Are they particularly old, can anyone enlighten me?

By Rob Patten
On 09/05/2010

I have seen the listed building schedule and it says that the buildings may have been connected with the flour mill opposite. They say possible 18th century? Perhaps someone knows more?

By Sylvia Woolford
On 18/05/2010

Was Number 5 Chapel street a Public house called the Jolly Sailor?

As far as I know, the only Jolly Sailor pub in Chapel Street was further along on the opposite side of the road. Andy, Editor.

By john snow
On 19/06/2010

You are right Andy, I remember it now, spent a lot of time there on a Saturday evening.

By john snow
On 24/06/2010

Hi, some of these photos stirred my memories of my earlier working days. When the roof of St. Michaels church was renewed, the leadwork in the valleys were fitted by John "Taffy" Wells and myself. The NatWest bank building was in those days reputed to be the tallest in the town. On several occasions I have walked around that parapet under the top windows to repair the leadwork on the dormers. My name and date can also be found etched on the topmost chimney stack. Not much "elf and safety" in those days. As for now, I could not even look up there, let alone climb it. I will leave all that to the young fellers.

By Colin Brandon
On 27/06/2010

The "Jolly Sailor" pub  was on opposite side of road to No 5 Chapel Street, on left, which had a cutting into Bridge Street ( Woolgars Passage" along that side of Chapel Street was also  "Debrows" I believed it was called, then Dell Whites mens hairdresser, Howells Cobbler on corner of  Essex Place, opposite him was a sweet shop, then abit further on the right Hill's the bakers, loved their bread as kids, as we lived opposite. Does anyone remember a row of shops opposite the Jolly Sailor ?  One was a fish shop I think and a chimney sweep lived there, anyone remember? Then there was the big Co-op on the corner of Bridge Street and Chapel Street.

By Rose Line nee Fitzroy
On 16/07/2010

Thank you for all these lovely pictures. I'm especially glad to see St Michael's Church, also the Old Rectory where I spent my childhood (father was Rector 1947-54). The Rectory was all one house then - about 14 rooms plus 2 attics and a cellar, and very large garden. The upstairs window was my sister's bedroom.

By Tony Evans
On 06/08/2010

10 Heighton Road was also known as "Orchard Meadow". My Aunt Bett and Uncle George lived there with my cousin Richard. I spent many years growing up in the village 1955-1970. We lived at 68 Denton Road my dad was Reg Rigby.

By Steve Rigby
On 21/01/2011

I hate to correct you Rose but the sequence of buildings you quote are a little out. "Debrows" was of course, "Devereux's", the grocer. "Howells the snobs" was on the corner of "Sussex Place" not Essex. (A reasonable mistake.) Dal White, the barber, was between the Jolly Sailor and the Co-op building. I do remember the opposite side of Chapel Street which had a row of very old cottages. No toilets, very bad condition. I did some "War Damage" repairs and painting there for Oxley and Bennett's. One of the Howells had another shoe repair shop there which backed onto the lane beside the infants school. My early pals lived opposite Hill's Bakery. The Hatchers, Robin, (Chicken). ("Appla") and Trevor, (Nimpscrew). Where those nicknames came from, I do not know. You must have known them Rose. Jack Patten

By Jack Patten, Canada
On 19/02/2011

Seeing the Church of St. Leonard Denton, brought back memories. I was married there (lily Fenner) on 31st March 1956 at the age of 22. I am so glad that it is considered a heritage site. I believe it is very old. 

By Lily Blin (Canada)
On 17/09/2011

A plaque was unveiled at 10, Heighton Road, Denton, on Saturday, October 8th, in memory of my friend Ralph Reader who lived there as a boy. I would be very pleased to know the name of his uncle with whom he lived after his parents died.

By DEREK ALLEN
On 09/10/2011

Ralph's uncle that he went to live with was Fred Frost. Fred was married to Georgina (nee Lovegrove) and Georgina's father was a market gardener who Ralph helped. The property at that time was called "Rose Cottage".

By Phil Smith
On 09/12/2011

Great to see pics & comments of these old buildings. My wife & I got married at the Church of St. Leonard Denton, in May 1970. We then lived in the (massive) flat above the National Westminster Bank for a couple of years, before buying a house in Meeching Road, called 'Meeching House'. Happy days, before the one way system !!!!

By Bill Simmons
On 07/02/2013

TO ROSE LINE...My Grandparents lived next door to the Fish shop in Chapel street for many years (Dunstall) Remember visiting when I was young abd the closed in back yard!

By Violet Hayne
On 29/03/2013

Regarding the the fish and chip shop opposite the Jolly Sailor (the landlord was Mr Simms). The fish shop was owned by Mr Bill Niner, who also had the shop/post office, and fish and chip shop in behind the houses in Gibbon Road. I lived with the Niners in Gibbon Road when I was 10 years old for 2 years, and spent some time with Bill senior in Chapel Street. He quite often popped over to the Jolly Sailor for a quick pint. Mrs Niner was related to the family of Rolfs Fishmongers at both Seaford and Brighton.

By John Hayward
On 06/04/2013

Number 5 Chapel Street, Newhaven, has spent a lot of its life as a butchers' shop.  My ancestor, Benjamin Towner worked (and even lived) there in the late 1870s/ early 1880s.  His elder brother Henry also had a butchers business in Newhaven for many years.  The Balcombes are another old Newhaven family of butchers.  At one time (mid 1800s) they owned and ran the town's slaughterhouse.   The Towners and Balcombes are related by marriage.  The premises at 5 Chapel Street was later occupied by "H. Dann, butchers", probably during the Edwardian period.  I visited the premises in 1987 and was told that there was no staircase in the building until the 20th century.  The upper floors were accessed by ladder only until then.  The listing fails to mention any of this.  Also, the flour mill building opposite, owned by the Towner brewery, was not demolished until 1987.   Peter Bailey took some photographs during its demolition.

By Reg Towner
On 09/11/2015

Is the Flour Mill mentioned, behind Devereux's. If so, my father Fred Bishop started his cabinet business in that building in the early 1960's, prior to moving to New Road.

By Ian Bishop
On 11/11/2015

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